Browsing articles tagged with " climate change"
Dec 27, 2014
econ4org
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Staying awake during the climate revolution

Rebecca Solnit writes in the Guardian:

Dismantling the fossil-fuel economy would undoubtedly have the side effect of breaking some of the warping power that oil has had in global and national politics. Of course, those wielding that power will not yield it without a ferocious battle – the very battle the climate movement is already engaged in on many fronts…

Read more here.

Dec 27, 2014
econ4org
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Facing climate adaptation

Econ4’s James Boyce writes in the Los Angeles Times:

In the years ahead, climate change will confront the world with hard choices: whether to protect as many dollars as possible, or to protect as many people as we can.

 

Read more here.

Aug 8, 2014
econ4org
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The carbon dividend

Econ4’s James Boyce writes on newly introduced climate legislation:

A major obstacle to climate policy in the United States has been the perception that the government is telling us how to live today in the name of those who will live tomorrow. Present-day pain for future gain is never an easy sell. And many Americans have a deep aversion to anything that smells like bigger government.

What if we could find a way to put more money in the pockets of families and less carbon in the atmosphere without expanding government? If the combination sounds too good to be true, read on.

Read his oped piece in the New York Times here. Read more about the new bill here.

Apr 24, 2014
boyce

Jobs, what jobs?

Movement Generation skewers pipeline “job creators”:

Source: http://www.movementgeneration.org/keystone-xl-has-a-job-for-you-video-resource-page

Apr 24, 2014
boyce

Hurricane name game

Why name hurricanes after innocent folks? Check out this video:

Source: http://climatenamechange.org/

Mar 21, 2014
econ4org

Rent in a warming world

Econ4’s James Boyce explains what rent’s got to do with climate change:

Read his piece here.

Mar 21, 2014
boyce

Energy efficiency takes off

Some good news from the energy efficiency frontlines:

[I]nvestment in energy efficiency is large and growing: $300 billion in 2011 by companies and governments in 11 countries. That is the same as total investment in electricity generation from oil, gas and coal, though less than investment in renewable electricity plus renewable-energy subsidies. But it saves more in emissions of carbon dioxide than all the spending on renewables, and pays for itself.

Read more here.

Dec 27, 2013
boyce

Carbon bubble

Sean McElwee and Lew Daly write about the disconnect between valuing oil and gas reserves and valuing the future of our planet:

 A whopping two-thirds of reserves listed on markets are potentially worthless.

Steve Waygood, head of Sustainability Research at Aviva Investors, a global asset management company, sums up the conundrum: “Valuations of the oil and gas sector still assume that they will be able to take all proven and probable reserves out of the ground and burn them. Based on credible data we cannot be allowed to do that…” So in much the same way that pre-Great Recession housing prices were based on the assumption that their values would continue to rise and homeowners would pay off their mortgages, the valuation of oil and gas companies is based on the assumption that they will be able to extract resources that must remain in the ground.

Read their piece here.

Nov 9, 2013
boyce

Subsidies that fuel fossil fuels

Worldwide subsidies for fossil fuels amount to a whopping $500 billion annually, according to a new report from London-based Overseas Development Institute:

They are subsidizing the very activities that are pushing the world towards dangerous climate change, and creating barriers to investment in low-carbon development.

 

Read about another tilted playing field here.

Oct 10, 2013
econ4org

Climate change and the limits of cost-benefit analysis

Econ4’s James Boyce explains why “efficiency” may be a poor basis for deciding whether to save the planet:

Source: Real News Network.

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