Browsing articles tagged with " environment"
Mar 10, 2016
boyce

Common wealth dividends

Peter Barnes explains how protecting the environment and sharing the fruits of our economy more broadly can – and should – go hand-in-hand:

The failure to charge for common wealth — for example, letting polluters dump freely into our atmosphere — leads to what economists call “nega­tive externalities.”  The costs of pollution aren’t paid by polluters; they are shifted to pollutees, nature and future generations.  And this mar­ket failure persists because no living individuals or companies would finan­cially bene­fit from fixing it.
But imagine a system in which everyone benefits from fixing this tragic flaw.  In this system, polluters would pay and all living citizens, as joint benefi­ci­aries and trus­tees of nature’s gifts, would get dividends.  The higher the price for using the commons, the larger the dividends and the lower the externalities.  The health of nature’s gifts would be directly linked to greater income for everyone.

Read more here.

Feb 2, 2016
boyce
Comments Off on Paving the way to a clean energy future

Paving the way to a clean energy future

And now, something hopeful:

The French government plans to pave 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) of its roads with solar panels in the next five years, which will supply power to millions of people.

“The maximum effect of the program, if successful, could be to furnish 5 million people with electricity, or about 8 percent of the French population,” Ségolène Royal, France’s minister of ecology and energy, said….

France’s Agency of Environment and Energy Management said that 4 meters (14 feet) of solarized road would be enough to supply the electrical needs of one household, excluding heat. One kilometer (0.62 miles) will supply enough electricity for 5,000 residents.

Read more and see a video about it here.

Jan 27, 2016
econ4org
Comments Off on Let them drink pollution?

Let them drink pollution?

The drinking water crisis in Flint, Michigan, is a wake-up call, writes Econ4’s James Boyce:

The tragic crisis in Flint, Michigan, where residents have been poisoned by lead contamination, is not just about drinking water. And it’s not just about Flint. It’s about race and class, and the stark contradiction between the American dream of equal rights and opportunity for all and the American nightmare of metastasizing inequality of wealth and power.

Read his post for the Institute for New Economic Thinking here.

Nov 25, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Another energy future is possible

Another energy future is possible

A new study by Stanford University scientist Mark Jacobson and colleagues offers a blueprint for a fossil-free energy future in the 50 U.S. states and across the globe:

Globally, the transition to clean, renewable energy would create more than 20 million more jobs than would be lost in the transition. It would also stabilize energy costs, thanks to free fuels such as wind, water and the sun; reduce terrorism risk by distributing electricity generation; and eliminate the overwhelming majority of heat-trapping emissions that contribute to climate change.

See an interactive world map here – and read more here.

Sep 3, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Nature Rx

Nature Rx

Price is not the same as value. Check out this un-drug commercial:

Source: http://www.nature-rx.org/

Jun 17, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Neil Young: Who’s Gonna Stand Up?

Neil Young: Who’s Gonna Stand Up?

Neil Young asks, “Who’s Gonna Stand Up and Save the Earth?”

Source: www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkiRR3T_3NY

May 19, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on True cost of fossil fuels

True cost of fossil fuels

A new IMF working paper estimates world spending on fossil fuel subsidies:

Fossil fuel companies are benefitting from global subsidies of $5.3tn (£3.4tn) a year, equivalent to $10m a minute every day, according to a startling new estimate by the International Monetary Fund.

The IMF calls the revelation “shocking” and says the figure is an “extremely robust” estimate of the true cost of fossil fuels. The $5.3tn subsidy estimated for 2015 is greater than the total health spending of all the world’s governments.

Read more here.

Mar 9, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Monopoly power v. solar power

Monopoly power v. solar power

The Washington Post reports from the electricity battleground in the clean energy transition, where surprising political realignments are emerging:

“Conservatives support solar — they support it even more than progressives do,” said Bryan Miller, co-chairman of the Alliance for Solar Choice and a vice president of public policy for Sunrun, a California solar provider. “It’s about competition in its most basic form. The idea that you should be forced to buy power from a state-sponsored monopoly and not have an option is about the least conservative thing you can imagine.”

Read more here.

Mar 7, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Banned in China: know your air

Banned in China: know your air

The powerful film (with English subtitles) on pollution – initially hailed, then banned, by Chinese officialdom:

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6X2uwlQGQM

From New York Times story on the ban:

On Friday evening [the day the film was banned], Xinhua, the state news agency, posted on Twitter, which is also blocked here, that “President Xi Jinping vows to punish, with an iron hand, any violators who destroy ecology or environment, with no exceptions.” That night, the United States Embassy air monitor in Beijing rated the air “hazardous.”

Read more here.

POSTSCRIPT: Chinese officials are not the alone in trying to suppress bad news on the environment. Check out the latest from Florida, here.

Dec 15, 2014
boyce
Comments Off on Let them eat toxic waste?

Let them eat toxic waste?

A video made by UMass-Amherst students compares wealth-based to rights-based principles for allocating environmental quality:

Pages:1234»