Browsing articles tagged with " inequality"
Nov 12, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Land of opportunity?

Land of opportunity?

From a new report on wealth inequality in America:

The three wealthiest people in the United States — Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, and Warren Buffett — now own more wealth than the entire bottom half of the American population combined, a total of 160 million people or 63 million households.

Read it here.

Nov 8, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Shares of the 1 percent

Shares of the 1 percent

Check out the graphics at the World Wealth & Income Database:

Source: http://wid.world/

Jul 26, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Unnatural disasters

Unnatural disasters

Disasters are not like rain that impartially falls on everyone beneath the cloud. Instead vulnerability is shaped by class, race, ethnicity and gender. Check out this trailer for a powerful new documentary:

Source: https://www.youtube.com/embed/WdZBO3lFmUc.

Jul 23, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Moral equality – and immoral inequality

Moral equality – and immoral inequality

From Robert Reich’s review of two new books about the perils of concentrated wealth & power:

The greatest threat to Western liberal democracies in the future is more likely to come from extreme inequality than from Islamic extremism. This is because inequality erodes two foundation stones of modern society — openness to new ideas and opportunities, and a conviction that all citizens are morally equal.

Read more here.

Jul 4, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Trumped

Trumped

Bernie Sanders offers an analysis of why Trump came to be president, and where we go from here:

I’m often asked by the media and others: How did it come about that Donald Trump, the most unpopular presidential candidate in the modern history of our country, won the election? And my answer is—and my answer is that Trump didn’t win the election; the Democratic Party lost the election.

Read his speech here.

Jul 3, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on This changes not much: performance of moral virtue as politics

This changes not much: performance of moral virtue as politics

Naomi Klein’s book This Changes Everything has attracted many admirers on the left. A thought-provoking exception is economist Peter Dorman, who writes:

[R]edefining politics as the performance of moral virtue rather than the contest for power can provide consolation when political avenues appear to be blocked. Activities of this sort are evaluated according to how expressive they are—how good they make us feel—rather than any objective criterion of effectiveness in achieving concrete goals or altering the balance of political forces.

Read his critique of the book here.

Feb 16, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Inequality undermining Social Security

Inequality undermining Social Security

The upward redistribution of income in the U.S. is undermining the nation’s Social Security:

if you’re a millionaire, February 16th is the last day that you will pay into the social security for the entire year. That’s because the Federal payroll tax cap is set at $127,000, so any money made beyond this point, is not subject to taxation that would fund this very crucial Federal social program.

See Real News Network interview with Dean Baker of the Center for Economic Policy Research here.

Jan 19, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on American bifurcation

American bifurcation

Inequality by the numbers:

Source: “Economic growth in the United States: A tale of two countries,” by Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman for the Washington Center for Equitable Growth.

Dec 9, 2016
boyce
Comments Off on Taxing inequality in Portland

Taxing inequality in Portland

Portland, Oregon, has instituted a first-ever tax on corporations that pay their CEOs more than 100 times as much as their workers. Econ4’s Doug Smith told the Portland City Council:

“Instead of building a real economy beneficial to all, these unethical pay practices spread outsourcing, offshoring, tax avoidance, downsizing and the substitution of good-paying permanent jobs with temporary, precarious employment.”

Read about it here.

Nov 7, 2016
econ4org
Comments Off on Universal basic assets

Universal basic assets

Econ4’s Jim Boyce and Peter Barnes, author of With Liberty and Dividends for All, break down how universal basic income could be funded by common wealth:

The wealth we inherit and create together is worth trillions of dollars, yet we presently derive almost no income from it. Our joint inheritance includes invaluable gifts of nature such as our atmosphere, minerals and fresh water, and socially created assets such as our legal and financial infrastructure, without which private corporations couldn’t exist, much less thrive. If our common assets were better managed, they could pay every American, including children, several hundred dollars a month.

Read their piece here.