Nov 18, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Meanwhile in the real world: Countries moving to a fossil-free future

Meanwhile in the real world: Countries moving to a fossil-free future

For a glimpse of what’s happening in countries that take climate change seriously, check out this short video:

Source: http://enb.iisd.org/videos/climate/unfccc-cop23-side-events/implementing-paris-and-the-sdgs-through-fuel-subsidy-reform-and-taxation/?autoplay

Nov 16, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on California working

California working

A video from the Labor Center at UC-Berkeley reports on the employment and growth results of progressive state policies in California:

Source: http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/california-is-working/

Nov 12, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Land of opportunity?

Land of opportunity?

From a new report on wealth inequality in America:

The three wealthiest people in the United States — Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, and Warren Buffett — now own more wealth than the entire bottom half of the American population combined, a total of 160 million people or 63 million households.

Read it here.

Nov 8, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Shares of the 1 percent

Shares of the 1 percent

Check out the graphics at the World Wealth & Income Database:

Source: http://wid.world/

Nov 4, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on “Five Things They Don’t Tell You About Law & Economics”

“Five Things They Don’t Tell You About Law & Economics”

A new video from APPEAL – the Association for the Promotion of Political Economy and the Law – challenges the “pro-efficiency” and “anti-regulation” ideology purveyed under the banner of “Law and Economics”:

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qoak05emri4&feature=youtu.be

Oct 21, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on The human & economic costs of pollution

The human & economic costs of pollution

A new report identifies the #1 cause of death worldwide: pollution.

Environmental pollution — from filthy air to contaminated water — is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world. More than smoking, hunger or natural disasters. More than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined.

One out of every six premature deaths in the world in 2015 — about 9 million — could be attributed to disease from toxic exposure, according to a major study released Thursday in the Lancet medical journal. The financial cost from pollution-related death, sickness and welfare is equally massive, the report says, costing some $4.6 trillion in annual losses — or about 6.2 percent of the global economy.

Read more here.

Sep 14, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Losing it all

Losing it all

Peter Barnes comments on Hillary’s swing-and-miss on funding universal basis income from common wealth:

IN HER LATEST book What Happened, former presidential nominee Hillary Clinton reveals that she was “fascinated” by the idea of using our national patrimony to pay every American “a modest basic income,” much as Alaska pays every resident yearly dividends from its oil wealth. Clinton spent weeks working with her policy team to see if this idea was “viable enough” to include in her campaign. Ultimately she decided that the numbers didn’t work, so she left the idea on the shelf.

Too bad. Whether or not embracing the idea would have swung the election her way, it would surely have sparked a lively discussion of our national patrimony — what’s in it, how much it’s worth, and who benefits most from it. Such a discussion would have shed surprising light on solutions to middle class decline, climate change, financial instability and economic stagnation. And it would have established that the numbers can work.

Read more here.

Sep 3, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on DNA for a new economy

DNA for a new economy

Econ4’s David Bollier writes in The Nation:

The energy for serious, durable change will originate, as always, on the periphery, far from the guarded sanctums of official power and respectable opinion. Resources may be scarce at the local level, but the potential for innovation is enormous: Here one finds fewer big institutional reputations at stake, a greater openness to risk-taking, and an abundance of grassroots imagination and enthusiasm.

Beyond the Beltway’s gaze, the seeds of a new social economy are being germinated in neighborhoods and farmers’ fields, in community initiatives and on digital platforms. A variety of experimental projects, innovative organizations, and social movements are developing new types of local provisioning and self-governance systems. Aspiring to much more than another wave of incremental reform, most of these actors deliberately bypass conventional politics and policy. In piecemeal fashion, they unabashedly seek to develop the DNA for new types of postcapitalist social and economic institutions.

Read more here.

Aug 19, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Fake infrastructure

Fake infrastructure

Econ4’s Jerry Epstein writes on Trump’s infrastructure “plan”:

Infrastructure investment: it’s that economic policy sweet spot that everyone loves to love.

Fixing bridges, building roads, modernizing airports, improving mass transportation, keeping lead out of our water: nearly everyone can relate to the need for it and can imagine how much better their lives would be with more of it.

Read his post here.

Jul 26, 2017
boyce
Comments Off on Unnatural disasters

Unnatural disasters

Disasters are not like rain that impartially falls on everyone beneath the cloud. Instead vulnerability is shaped by class, race, ethnicity and gender. Check out this trailer for a powerful new documentary:

Source: https://www.youtube.com/embed/WdZBO3lFmUc.

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