Browsing articles in "Articles"
Jun 18, 2015
boyce

What’s in a trade agreement?

These days trade agreements are not just about imports and exports. They’re also about undermining the power of governments to protect public health and the environment by regulating corporate behavior – via provisions slipped into trade agreements in the guise of “Investor-State Dispute Settlement” (I.S.D.S.), as James Surowiecki explains in the New Yorker:

In the old days, aggrieved American investors would call on the Navy to protect their interests—thus the phrase “gunboat diplomacy.” How much better that now they just call their lawyers.

But these days signing such agreements is risky for countries. I.S.D.S. lawsuits used to be rare, but they’re becoming a growth industry. Nearly a hundred have been filed in the past two years, as against some five hundred in the quarter century before that. Investor protection, previously a sideshow in corporate law, is now a regular part of law-school curricula. “We’ve also seen an expansion in the types of claims that have been brought,” Lise Johnson, the head of investment law and policy at the Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment, told me. I.S.D.S. was originally meant to protect investors against seizure of their assets by foreign governments. Now I.S.D.S. lawsuits go after things like cancelled licenses, unapproved permits, and unwelcome regulations.

To learn more about what’s in a trade agreement, read his story here. For more, see blog entries on TripleCrisis here.

May 19, 2015
boyce

True cost of fossil fuels

A new IMF working paper estimates world spending on fossil fuel subsidies:

Fossil fuel companies are benefitting from global subsidies of $5.3tn (£3.4tn) a year, equivalent to $10m a minute every day, according to a startling new estimate by the International Monetary Fund.

The IMF calls the revelation “shocking” and says the figure is an “extremely robust” estimate of the true cost of fossil fuels. The $5.3tn subsidy estimated for 2015 is greater than the total health spending of all the world’s governments.

Read more here.

Apr 19, 2015
boyce

Divestment pressure mounts

This week’s student protests put the heat on Harvard:

“Throughout Harvard heat week, Harvard’s top decision-makers have been hiding from both their students and from the issue of climate justice,” protesters wrote in a statement on Wednesday. “They must face the broad, diverse, and growing coalition behind divestment from fossil fuels.”

Read more coverage here and here. And check out the Divest Harvard facebook page here.

Mar 31, 2015
boyce

Stranded asset denial

John Ashton, formerly Britain’s top climate diplomat, writes in an open letter to the president of Shell Oil:

You deny your assets will be stranded. True, first tier assets are cheap, and those that are heavily invested in tend to bear fruit quickly. But your case also assumes failure on 2C and rates of renewables deployment long surpassed by reality.

The Bank of England is watching the carbon bubble. Bloomberg screens include a carbon risk valuation tool. The divestment movement may still be small but it is rallying young people, has moral authority, and can now make a prudential case as well as an environmental one.

Writing on the wall. Story of the world.

You could accept squarely that the days of yesterday’s business model are numbered, that the challenge now is to manage its decline and build alongside it a new business fit for today.

Read his letter here. Read the story here.

Mar 11, 2015
boyce

Stranded fossil assets

Bill McKibben writing in The Guardian on the coming shift in the world energy economy:

What in 2013 was the rallying cry of a few student campaigners has by 2015 become the conventional wisdom: there’s a “carbon bubble,” composed of the trillions of dollars of coal and oil and gas that simply must be left underground. Here’s the president of World Bank speaking in Davos: “Use smart due diligence. Rethink what fiduciary responsibility means in this changing world. It’s simple self-interest. Every company, investor and bank that screens new and existing investments for climate risk is simply being pragmatic….”

Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of England, did his best to explain the unwelcome news to the industry at a conference last October: the “vast majority” of the planet’s carbon reserves “are unburnable,” he said. When Shell’s chief executive hit back last month, calling a rapid transition off fossil fuel “simply naïve,” it was Tory veteran and chair of parliament’s energy committee Tim Yeo who told him off: “I do believe the problem of stranded assets is a real one now. Investors are starting to think by 2030 the world will be in such a panic about climate change that either by law or by price it will be very hard to burn fossil fuels on anything like the scale we are doing at the moment.”

Read his analysis here.

Mar 9, 2015
boyce

Monopoly power v. solar power

The Washington Post reports from the electricity battleground in the clean energy transition, where surprising political realignments are emerging:

“Conservatives support solar — they support it even more than progressives do,” said Bryan Miller, co-chairman of the Alliance for Solar Choice and a vice president of public policy for Sunrun, a California solar provider. “It’s about competition in its most basic form. The idea that you should be forced to buy power from a state-sponsored monopoly and not have an option is about the least conservative thing you can imagine.”

Read more here.

Mar 5, 2015
boyce

Guaranteed income from common wealth

Peter Barnes writes in Yes! magazine:

THERE’S LONG been a notion that, because money is a prerequisite for survival and security, everyone should be assured some income just for being alive.  The notion has been advanced by liberals such as James Tobin, John Kenneth Galbraith, and George McGovern, and by conser­vatives like Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman, and Richard Nixon.  It’s embedded in the board game Monopoly, in which all players get equal payments when they pass Go.  And yet, with one exception, Americans have been unable to agree on any plan that guarantees some income to everyone.  The reasons lie mostly in the stories that surround such income.  Is it welfare?  Is it redistribution?  Does it require higher taxes and bigger government?  Americans think dimly of all these things.

But then, there’s the exception.

Read all about it here.

Feb 19, 2015
boyce

Rising student demand for new economics

From the Economist:

“I DON’T care who writes a nation’s laws, or crafts its advanced treatises, if I can write its economics textbooks.” So said Paul Samuelson, an American economist who more than achieved his aim by producing a bestseller. But debate swirls around the teaching of the dismal science—nowhere more so than in Britain.

Read more here.

Jan 7, 2015
boyce
Comments Off

CEO Payday

The numbers tell the story (source: Economic Policy Institute).

 

Dec 27, 2014
econ4org
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Staying awake during the climate revolution

Rebecca Solnit writes in the Guardian:

Dismantling the fossil-fuel economy would undoubtedly have the side effect of breaking some of the warping power that oil has had in global and national politics. Of course, those wielding that power will not yield it without a ferocious battle – the very battle the climate movement is already engaged in on many fronts…

Read more here.

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