Browsing articles tagged with " climate change"
Nov 9, 2013
boyce
Comments Off on Subsidies that fuel fossil fuels

Subsidies that fuel fossil fuels

Worldwide subsidies for fossil fuels amount to a whopping $500 billion annually, according to a new report from London-based Overseas Development Institute:

They are subsidizing the very activities that are pushing the world towards dangerous climate change, and creating barriers to investment in low-carbon development.

 

Read about another tilted playing field here.

Oct 10, 2013
econ4org
Comments Off on Climate change and the limits of cost-benefit analysis

Climate change and the limits of cost-benefit analysis

Econ4’s James Boyce explains why “efficiency” may be a poor basis for deciding whether to save the planet:

Source: Real News Network.

Jul 7, 2013
boyce
Comments Off on Tax students, or polluters?

Tax students, or polluters?

From Robert Reich’s blog:

A basic economic principle is government ought to tax what we want to discourage, and not tax what we want to encourage.

For example, if we want less carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, we should tax carbon polluters. On the other hand, if we want more students from lower-income families to be able to afford college, we shouldn’t put a tax on student loans.

Read his post here.

Jun 17, 2013
econ4org
Comments Off on Unlocking our climate wealth

Unlocking our climate wealth

Econ4’s James Boyce on how to translate good principles into good practice:

Source: http://tedxtraversecity.com/videos/

Jan 11, 2013
boyce
Comments Off on Development: beyond aid and trade

Development: beyond aid and trade

Dani Rodrik explains how rich countries could promote development overseas:

First, a new global compact should focus more directly on rich countries’ responsibilities. Second, it should emphasize policies beyond aid and trade that have an equal, if not greater, impact on poor countries’ development prospects.

A short list of such policies would include:

  • carbon taxes and other measures to ameliorate climate change;
  • more work visas to allow larger temporary migration flows from poor countries;
  • strict controls on arms sales to developing nations;
  • reduced support for repressive regimes; and
  • improved sharing of financial information to reduce money laundering and tax avoidance.

Notice that most of these measures are actually aimed at reducing damage—for example, climate change, military conflict, and financial crime—that otherwise results from rich countries’ conduct. “Do no harm” is as good a principle here as it is in medicine.

Read his piece here.

Nov 1, 2012
boyce
Comments Off on Superstorm Sandy: Harbinger of things to come?

Superstorm Sandy: Harbinger of things to come?

Five years ago, this picture appeared in report titled Nation Under Siege: Sea Level Rise at Our Doorstep. It depicts what would happen – and this week, did happen – as a result of a 3-meter rise in sea levels in New York City:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Was superstorm Sandy a preview of what sea level rise will bring—permanently—to New York and other coastal cities by century’s end?

 

Read about it here.

Jul 31, 2012
boyce
Comments Off on Know your climate’s enemy

Know your climate’s enemy

Bill McKibben breaks down the “new math” of global warming:

We have five times as much oil and coal and gas on the books as climate scientists think is safe to burn….

Yes, this coal and gas and oil is still technically in the soil. But it’s already economically aboveground – it’s figured into share prices, companies are borrowing money against it, nations are basing their budgets on the presumed returns from their patrimony. It explains why the big fossil-fuel companies have fought so hard to prevent the regulation of carbon dioxide – those reserves are their primary asset, the holding that gives their companies their value. It’s why they’ve worked so hard these past years to figure out how to unlock the oil in Canada’s tar sands, or how to drill miles beneath the sea, or how to frack the Appalachians.

Read it here.

Apr 27, 2012
boyce
Comments Off on Colbert: United Against Them

Colbert: United Against Them

Stephen Colbert finds common ground between liberals and conservatives: blame immigrants for climate change.

 

Dec 19, 2011
boyce

Cap-and-dividend climate policy

This short cartoon from www.capanddividend.org lays out how a cap-and-dividend climate policy would work:

Source: Cap’n Dividend.

Dec 11, 2011
boyce
Comments Off on “Get It Done”

“Get It Done”

Youth delegate Anjali Appadurai at the Durban climate summit.

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ko3e6G_7GY4.

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