Browsing articles tagged with " education"
May 23, 2015
boyce

An international student call for pluralism in economics

From an open letter signed by student associations from across the world:

It is not only the world economy that is in crisis. The teaching of economics is in crisis too, and this crisis has consequences far beyond the university walls. What is taught shapes the minds of the next generation of policymakers, and therefore shapes the societies we live in. We, over 65 associations of economics students from over 30 different countries, believe it is time to reconsider the way economics is taught.

Read more here.

May 9, 2015
boyce

Real-world microeconomics

Here’s an introductory textbook – written by Econ4’s Jerry Friedman – that not only covers the usual micro topics but goes beyond, putting the economic behavior of consumers and firms into its social context:

This unique textbook covers all the standard topics of an introductory microeconomics course, including the profit-maximizing firm, the utility-maximizing consumer, supply and demand, price and income elasticities, factors of production and their marginal products, and so on. But this book does much more: it offers both an alternative vision of microeconomics—placing individual decision-making in the context of social norms and institutions—and cogent criticism of neoclassical theory. Students using this book will get more than just an introduction to mainstream microeconomics—they will gain a deeper and more critical understanding of it.

Friedman cover--273x352   Read more about Microeconomics: Individual Choice in Communities here.

Read more about other economics textbooks from Dollars and Sense here.

Feb 19, 2015
boyce

Rising student demand for new economics

From the Economist:

“I DON’T care who writes a nation’s laws, or crafts its advanced treatises, if I can write its economics textbooks.” So said Paul Samuelson, an American economist who more than achieved his aim by producing a bestseller. But debate swirls around the teaching of the dismal science—nowhere more so than in Britain.

Read more here.

Nov 21, 2014
boyce
Comments Off on Inequality of opportunity

Inequality of opportunity

Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz writes:

A rich country with millions of poor people. A country that prides itself on being the land of opportunity, but in which a child’s prospects are more dependent on the income and education of his or her parents than in other advanced countries. A country that believes in fair play, but in which the richest often pay a smaller percentage of their income in taxes than those less well off. A country in which children every day pledge allegiance to the flag, asserting that there is “justice for all,” but in which, increasingly, there is only justice for those who can afford it. These are the contradictions that the United States is gradually and painfully struggling to come to terms with as it begins to comprehend the enormity of the inequalities that mark its society.

Read more here.

Sep 17, 2014
boyce
Comments Off on core-econ

core-econ

Free access to the beta version of a remarkable new textbook that aims to change economics education:

http://core-econ.org/

For a review by Econ4’s David Bollier, see here.

Sep 15, 2014
boyce
Comments Off on Rethinking Economics: a new international student network

Rethinking Economics: a new international student network

“An international network of rethinkers coming together to demystify, diversify, and invigorate economics”:

http://www.rethinkeconomics.org/

Sep 1, 2014
boyce
Comments Off on German network of pluralist economics students

German network of pluralist economics students

German students organize for new economic thinking:

https://www.plurale-oekonomik.de/home/

May 6, 2014
boyce

Students call for pluralism in economics education

There is growing demand from students around the world for profound changes in how economics is being taught:

We, 42 associations of economics students from 19 different countries, believe it is time to reconsider the way economics is taught. We are dissatisfied with the dramatic narrowing of the curriculum that has taken place over the last couple of decades. This lack of intellectual diversity does not only restrain education and research. It limits our ability to contend with the multidimensional challenges of the 21st century – from financial stability, to food security and climate change. The real world should be brought back into the classroom, as well as debate and a pluralism of theories and methods. This will help renew the discipline and ultimately create a space in which solutions to society’s problems can be generated.

Read more here.

And The Guardian‘s coverage here.

Apr 24, 2014
boyce

Post-crash economics

Students at Manchester University lay out the case for changes in economics education:

In short, we argue for pluralism of perspectives and the inclusion of ethics, history and politics. We advocate an approach that begins with economic phenomena and then gives students a toolkit to evaluate how well different perspectives can explain it. The discipline should be conceptualised as an ecosystem, as the importance of diversity and the cross-fertilisation of paradigms are key to success.

Read more here.

For some background on this initiative, see here.

Feb 6, 2014
boyce

Rethinking economics

Demand from students for reality-based, ethically grounded economics is growing around the world:

When the financial crisis hit in 2007, economics students at respected institutions around the world found that theories handed down in classrooms failed to explain the reality outside, and an international movement began to demand a change in the way economics is taught.

Read more here.

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