Browsing articles tagged with " education"

core-econ

Sep 17, 2014   //   by boyce   //   Websites  //  No Comments

Free access to the beta version of a remarkable new textbook that aims to change economics education:

http://core-econ.org/

For a review by Econ4′s David Bollier, see here.

Rethinking Economics: a new international student network

Sep 15, 2014   //   by boyce   //   Websites  //  No Comments

“An international network of rethinkers coming together to demystify, diversify, and invigorate economics”:

http://www.rethinkeconomics.org/

German network of pluralist economics students

Sep 1, 2014   //   by boyce   //   Websites  //  No Comments

German students organize for new economic thinking:

https://www.plurale-oekonomik.de/home/

Students call for pluralism in economics education

May 6, 2014   //   by boyce   //   Articles  //  No Comments

There is growing demand from students around the world for profound changes in how economics is being taught:

We, 42 associations of economics students from 19 different countries, believe it is time to reconsider the way economics is taught. We are dissatisfied with the dramatic narrowing of the curriculum that has taken place over the last couple of decades. This lack of intellectual diversity does not only restrain education and research. It limits our ability to contend with the multidimensional challenges of the 21st century – from financial stability, to food security and climate change. The real world should be brought back into the classroom, as well as debate and a pluralism of theories and methods. This will help renew the discipline and ultimately create a space in which solutions to society’s problems can be generated.

Read more here.

And The Guardian‘s coverage here.

Post-crash economics

Apr 24, 2014   //   by boyce   //   Articles  //  No Comments

Students at Manchester University lay out the case for changes in economics education:

In short, we argue for pluralism of perspectives and the inclusion of ethics, history and politics. We advocate an approach that begins with economic phenomena and then gives students a toolkit to evaluate how well different perspectives can explain it. The discipline should be conceptualised as an ecosystem, as the importance of diversity and the cross-fertilisation of paradigms are key to success.

Read more here.

For some background on this initiative, see here.

Rethinking economics

Feb 6, 2014   //   by boyce   //   Articles  //  No Comments

Demand from students for reality-based, ethically grounded economics is growing around the world:

When the financial crisis hit in 2007, economics students at respected institutions around the world found that theories handed down in classrooms failed to explain the reality outside, and an international movement began to demand a change in the way economics is taught.

Read more here.

The tilted playing field: in public education, some are more equal than others

Nov 9, 2013   //   by boyce   //   Articles  //  No Comments

In his classic novel Animal Farm, George Orwell famously wrote that “some are more equal than others.” Turns out the same is true for public education in the United States. Eduardo Porter’s column in the Times explains why America’s educational playing field is far from level:

The United States is one of few advanced nations where schools serving better-off children usually have more educational resources than those serving poor students, according to research by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Among the 34 O.E.C.D. nations, only in the United States, Israel and Turkey do disadvantaged schools have lower teacher/student ratios than in those serving more privileged students.

Andreas Schleicher, who runs the O.E.C.D.’s international educational assessments, put it to me this way: “The bottom line is that the vast majority of O.E.C.D. countries either invest equally into every student or disproportionately more into disadvantaged students. The U.S. is one of the few countries doing the opposite.”

Read his piece here.

Student debt hits the fan

May 24, 2013   //   by boyce   //   Articles  //  No Comments

Jason Sattler writes that Senator Elizabeth Warren is asking a good question:

Why does the government give the big banks a better deal than it gives students?

It’s question so perfect that people can’t stop talking about it.

The first standalone bill from Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) would not only prevent student loan rates from doubling, it would cut them down to the same rate the Fed charges banks to borrow money overnight for the next 12 months. And the idea has taken off like wildfire, with more than 400,000 people signing on to support the legislation.

Read more here.

The tilted playing field

Feb 18, 2013   //   by boyce   //   Articles  //  No Comments

For many Americans, Nobel laureate Joe Stiglitz writes, the dream of upward mobility is being subverted by the reality of unequal opportunity:

Probably the most important reason for lack of equality of opportunity is education: both its quantity and quality. After World War II, Europe made a major effort to democratize its education systems. We did, too, with the G.I. Bill, which extended higher education to Americans across the economic spectrum. But then we changed, in several ways. While racial segregation decreased, economic segregation increased. After 1980, the poor grew poorer, the middle stagnated, and the top did better and better. Disparities widened between those living in poor localities and those living in rich suburbs — or rich enough to send their kids to private schools. A result was a widening gap in educational performance…

In some cases it seems as if policy has actually been designed to reduce opportunity: government support for many state schools has been steadily gutted over the last few decades — and especially in the last few years. Meanwhile, students are crushed by giant student loan debts that are almost impossible to discharge, even in bankruptcy. This is happening at the same time that a college education is more important than ever for getting a good job.

A level playing field is a key element of Econ4′s vision of how an economy that works for people, the planet and the future.

The student debt trap and inequality in America

Jan 20, 2013   //   by boyce   //   Articles, Media Library  //  No Comments

Nobel laureate Joe Stiglitz writes:

In 2010, student debt, now $1 trillion, exceeded credit-card debt for the first time.

Student debt can almost never be wiped out, even in bankruptcy. A parent who co-signs a loan can’t necessarily have the debt discharged even if his child dies. The debt can’t be discharged even if the school — operated for profit and owned by exploitative financiers — provided an inadequate education, enticed the student with misleading promises, and failed to get her a decent job.

Instead of pouring money into the banks, we could have tried rebuilding the economy from the bottom up…. We could have recognized that when young people are jobless, their skills atrophy. We could have made sure that every young person was either in school, in a training program or on a job. Instead, we let youth unemployment rise to twice the national average. The children of the rich can stay in college or attend graduate school, without accumulating enormous debt, or take unpaid internships to beef up their résumés. Not so for those in the middle and bottom. We are sowing the seeds of ever more inequality in the coming years.

Read his dissection of how economic and political inequality are poisoning opportunity in America here.

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