Browsing articles tagged with " taxes"
Feb 13, 2014
boyce
Comments Off on Who’s afraid of the T-word?

Who’s afraid of the T-word?

Jeffrey Sachs writes that investing in our future will require new tax revenues, along with reined-in war spending and real health care reform:

Much as conservatives hate to admit it, the landslide election of Bill de Blasio as mayor of New York City may prefigure the start of a new swing of the national political pendulum as well. He won a resounding victory, in part by calling for a small rise in taxes to fund preschool education, a major reform that would help relieve the disadvantages faced by poorer children. The recent meeting of mayors at the White House may give a hint of possible local pressures for increased public investments and public services. We’ve been on a thirty-year course of diminished public investments in our future. The dismal results are plain to see.

Read his piece here.

Nov 9, 2013
boyce
Comments Off on The tilted playing field: in public education, some are more equal than others

The tilted playing field: in public education, some are more equal than others

In his classic novel Animal Farm, George Orwell famously wrote that “some are more equal than others.” Turns out the same is true for public education in the United States. Eduardo Porter’s column in the Times explains why America’s educational playing field is far from level:

The United States is one of few advanced nations where schools serving better-off children usually have more educational resources than those serving poor students, according to research by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Among the 34 O.E.C.D. nations, only in the United States, Israel and Turkey do disadvantaged schools have lower teacher/student ratios than in those serving more privileged students.

Andreas Schleicher, who runs the O.E.C.D.’s international educational assessments, put it to me this way: “The bottom line is that the vast majority of O.E.C.D. countries either invest equally into every student or disproportionately more into disadvantaged students. The U.S. is one of the few countries doing the opposite.”

Read his piece here.

Nov 5, 2013
boyce
Comments Off on A view from the top

A view from the top

Bill Gross, managing director of the investment firm PIMCO, urges the 1% to get some common economic sense:

1) Growth depends on investment and investment in part depends on an equitable rebalancing of personal income taxes, capital gains and carried interest.

2) The era of taxing “capital” at lower rates than “labor” should end.

3) Investors in the U.S. and elsewhere must look for investment in the real economy, not share buy-back maneuvers that artificially elevate stock prices.

Read his blog on the “Scrooge McDucks” of the world and the need for real tax reform here.

Jul 7, 2013
boyce
Comments Off on Tax students, or polluters?

Tax students, or polluters?

From Robert Reich’s blog:

A basic economic principle is government ought to tax what we want to discourage, and not tax what we want to encourage.

For example, if we want less carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, we should tax carbon polluters. On the other hand, if we want more students from lower-income families to be able to afford college, we shouldn’t put a tax on student loans.

Read his post here.

Mar 25, 2013
boyce
Comments Off on Defend Social Security, or else

Defend Social Security, or else

Check it out, kids:

Source: http://www.justscrapthecap.com/

Feb 10, 2013
boyce
Comments Off on Benefits without responsibilities: the American way?

Benefits without responsibilities: the American way?

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (Ind- VT) on corporate takers:

In 2010, Bank of America set up more than 200 subsidiaries in the Cayman Islands (which has a corporate tax rate of 0.0 percent) to avoid paying U.S. taxes. It worked. Not only did Bank of America pay nothing in federal income taxes, but it received a rebate from the IRS worth $1.9 billion that year. They are not alone. In 2010, JP Morgan Chase operated 83 subsidiaries incorporated in offshore tax havens to avoid paying some $4.9 billion in U.S. taxes. That same year Goldman Sachs operated 39 subsidiaries in offshore tax havens to avoid an estimated $3.3 billion in U.S. taxes. Citigroup has paid no federal income taxes for the last four years after receiving a total of $2.5 trillion in financial assistance from the Federal Reserve during the financial crisis.

On and on it goes. Wall Street banks and large companies love America when they need corporate welfare. But when it comes to paying American taxes or American wages, they want nothing to do with this country.

Read more here.

Jan 26, 2013
boyce
Comments Off on Good jobs first

Good jobs first

Tracking state subsidies to corporations. Check out their latest report:

 

 

 

 

Read it here.

Dec 20, 2012
boyce
Comments Off on Race to the bottom

Race to the bottom

Econ4’s Jerry Epstein breaks downs the fallacy of ‘tax incentives’ as a lure to investment:

Source: The Real News Network.

Read the New York Times story on corporate tax giveaways here.

Nov 2, 2012
boyce
Comments Off on Economics denial

Economics denial

The New York Times reports today on attempts to suppress a Congressional Research Service report showing that tax cuts for the rich don’t create jobs:

“The reduction in the top tax rates appears to be uncorrelated with saving, investment and productivity growth. The top tax rates appear to have little or no relation to the size of the economic pie,” the report said. “However, the top tax rate reductions appear to be associated with the increasing concentration of income at the top of the income distribution.”

Read the Times piece here.

Read the suppressed report here.

Nov 1, 2012
boyce
Comments Off on How not to create jobs

How not to create jobs

Lessons from Recent History 101: the Bush tax cuts.

It is Orwellian that after a decade of trillion dollar tax cuts and bailouts of the rich, and a steadily worsening jobs and employment picture for American workers, we are told to be kind to the rich and give them even more money because they are the “jobs creators”.

Read more here.

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