Browsing articles tagged with " inequality"
Nov 7, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Lazy ideology

Lazy ideology

In his column in the business pages of the New York Times, Eduardo Porter writes that discredited notions still guide policy on aid to the poor:

Actual experience, from the richest country in the world to some of the poorest places on the planet, suggests that cash assistance can be of enormous help for the poor. And freeing them from what President Ronald Reagan memorably termed the “spider’s web of dependency” — also known as forcing the poor to swim or sink — is not the cure-all for social ills its supporters claim….

Abhijit Banerjee, a director of the Poverty Action Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, released a paper with three colleagues last week that carefully assessed the effects of seven cash-transfer programs in Mexico, Morocco, Honduras, Nicaragua, the Philippines and Indonesia. It found “no systematic evidence that cash transfer programs discourage work.”

A World Bank report from 2014 examined cash assistance programs in Africa, Asia and Latin America and found, contrary to popular stereotype, the money was not typically squandered on things like alcohol and tobacco.

Still, Professor Banerjee observed, in many countries, “we encounter the idea that handouts will make people lazy.”

Professor Banerjee suggests the spread of welfare aversion around the world might be an American confection. “Many governments have economic advisers with degrees from the United States who share the same ideology,” he said. “Ideology is much more pervasive than the facts.”

Read more here.

Nov 5, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on The facts of (political) life

The facts of (political) life

Writing in the New Yorker, George Packer dissects America’s political conundrum:

[T]here’s a reason to look up as well as down the economic ladder, and it has nothing to do with envy or with punishing the rich. Economic stratification, and the rise of a super-wealthy class, threatens our democracy. Americans are growing increasingly separated from one another along lines of class, in every aspect of life: where they’re born and grow up, where they go to school, what they eat, how they travel, whom they marry, what their children do, how long they live, how they die. What kind of “national community” built on “mutual obligation” is possible when Americans have so little shared experience? The Princeton economist Alan Krueger has demonstrated that societies with higher levels of income inequality are societies with lower levels of social mobility. As America has grown less economically equal, a citizen’s ability to move upward has fallen behind that of citizens in other Western democracies. We are no longer the country where anyone can become anything.

Read his piece here.

Oct 18, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Why tax the ultra-wealthy?

Why tax the ultra-wealthy?

Interesting numbers from the New York Times:

The top 1 percent includes about 1.13 million households earning an average income of $2.1 million.

Raising their total tax burden to, say, 40 percent would generate about $157 billion in revenue the first year. Increasing it to 45 percent brings in a whopping $276 billion. Even taking account of state and local taxes, the average household in this group would still take home at least $1 million a year.

If the tax increase were limited to just the 115,000 households in the top 0.1 percent, with an average income of $9.4 million, a 40 percent tax rate would produce $55 billion in extra revenue in its first year.

That would more than cover, for example, the estimated $47 billion cost of eliminating undergraduate tuition at all the country’s four-year public colleges and universities, as Senator Bernie Sanders has proposed, or Mrs. Clinton’s cheaper plan for a debt-free college degree, with money left over to help fund universal prekindergarten.

Read more here.

Sep 7, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Labor Day – or Assets Day?

Labor Day – or Assets Day?

Econ4’s Doug Smith writes for Naked Capitalism on the hypocrisy of celebrating Labor Day while screwing workers:

You, my friends, are truly champion asset creators! Your long-suffering self-denial of working for crap wages contributes to massive corporate profits that executives tap to buy-back company stock in order to keep those asset values high. Your low-to-no wages give you as consumers the God-given freedom to borrow and, thereby, fund securitized assets. And, when those asset values get threatened, your taxes come to the rescue through bailouts and mumbo jumbo (“quantitative easing”).

Read his piece here.

Aug 18, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Value creation v. value extraction

Value creation v. value extraction

Bill Lazonick writes in the Harvard Business Review:

The debate over how to reverse ever-increasing income inequality has moved front and center in the Democratic presidential campaign. In speeches on July 13 and July 24, front-runner Hillary Clinton first outlined and then elaborated upon her policy agenda for combating what she calls “quarterly capitalism.” In emphasizing the need for value-creating business investment in an economy in which value-extracting financial interests are driving corporate resource-allocation decisions, the Clinton economic reform package is novel and refreshing for a Democratic presidential contender….

But perhaps the most elegant solution is one Clinton has not yet advocated: simply banning corporations from making open-market repurchases of their shares.

Read Lazonick’s piece here. See Econ4’s Jerry Epstein take on this issue here.

Jul 11, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on It’s Our Economy

It’s Our Economy

The “It’s Our Economy” project works for economic democracy:

It’s Our Economy is dedicated to changing the dynamic of the current economy designed for the wealthiest to an economy built on principles of equity, cooperation, and sustainability. An economy that puts people and the planet before profits would reduce the wealth divide while giving people more control over their economic lives. We believe that a more just, modern, and restorative economy would involve the people in economic decision-making in both their communities and the nation more broadly.

This basic idea is economic democracy.

Check out their website here.

Mar 5, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Guaranteed income from common wealth

Guaranteed income from common wealth

Peter Barnes writes in Yes! magazine:

THERE’S LONG been a notion that, because money is a prerequisite for survival and security, everyone should be assured some income just for being alive.  The notion has been advanced by liberals such as James Tobin, John Kenneth Galbraith, and George McGovern, and by conser­vatives like Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman, and Richard Nixon.  It’s embedded in the board game Monopoly, in which all players get equal payments when they pass Go.  And yet, with one exception, Americans have been unable to agree on any plan that guarantees some income to everyone.  The reasons lie mostly in the stories that surround such income.  Is it welfare?  Is it redistribution?  Does it require higher taxes and bigger government?  Americans think dimly of all these things.

But then, there’s the exception.

Read all about it here.

Jan 18, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on Inequality.org

Inequality.org

A portal for people seeking information and analysis on economic inequality in the United States, with lots of data, news items and links:

http://inequality.org/

Jan 7, 2015
boyce
Comments Off on CEO Payday

CEO Payday

The numbers tell the story (source: Economic Policy Institute).

 

Dec 27, 2014
econ4org
Comments Off on Facing climate adaptation

Facing climate adaptation

Econ4’s James Boyce writes in the Los Angeles Times:

In the years ahead, climate change will confront the world with hard choices: whether to protect as many dollars as possible, or to protect as many people as we can.

 

Read more here.